Shakespeares the merchant of venice is a play of love and hate

These themes were juxtaposed throughout the play to create contrast and controversy and also to convey this polarity to the viewing audience. The acts and scenes in the Merchant of Venice were also juxtaposed carefully to highlight the individual characters strengths and weaknesses, flaws and virtues to allow the audience to analyse them and decide where our sympathies ought to lie. Throughout the play however, we witnessed a kaleidoscope of different sides to each character through their interaction with other characters. As the play progressed and the characters revealed their true colours, we as the audience reassessed our feelings towards them and subsequently, our sympathies were always changing.

Shakespeares the merchant of venice is a play of love and hate

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Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Self-Interest Versus Love On the surface, the main difference between the Christian characters and Shylock appears to be that the Christian characters value human relationships over business ones, whereas Shylock is only interested in money.

The Christian characters certainly view the matter this way. With these words, he apparently values his money at least as much as his daughter, suggesting that his greed outweighs his love.

Shakespeare's characterisation of Shylock in 'The Merchant of Venice' - Assignment Example

However, upon closer inspection, this supposed difference between Christian and Jew breaks down. Some human relationships do indeed matter to Shylock more than money.

Moreover, his insistence that he have a pound of flesh rather than any amount of money shows that his resentment is much stronger than his greed. Though Portia and Bassanio come to love one another, Bassanio seeks her hand in the first place because he is monstrously in debt and needs her money.

Bassanio even asks Antonio to look at the money he lends Bassanio as an investment, though Antonio insists that he lends him the money solely out of love.

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In other words, Bassanio is anxious to view his relationship with Antonio as a matter of business rather than of love. Finally, Shylock eloquently argues that Jews are human beings just as Christians are, but Christians such as Antonio hate Jews simply because they are Jews.

Thus, while the Christian characters may talk more about mercy, love, and charity, they are not always consistent in how they display these qualities. The Divine Quality of Mercy The conflict between Shylock and the Christian characters comes to a head over the issue of mercy.

Human beings should be merciful because God is merciful: According to the writings of St. Paul in the New Testament, the Old Testament depicts God as requiring strict adherence to rules and exacting harsh punishments for those who stray. The New Testament, in contrast, emphasizes adherence to the spirit rather than the letter of the law, portraying a God who forgives rather than punishes and offers salvation to those followers who forgive others.

Thus, when Portia warns Shylock against pursuing the law without regard for mercy, she is promoting what Elizabethan Christians would have seen as a pro-Christian, anti-Jewish agenda. The strictures of Renaissance drama demanded that Shylock be a villain, and, as such, patently unable to show even a drop of compassion for his enemy.

A sixteenth-century audience would not expect Shylock to exercise mercy—therefore, it is up to the Christians to do so.

Shakespeares the merchant of venice is a play of love and hate

Instead, she backs Shylock into a corner, where she strips him of his bond, his estate, and his dignity, forcing him to kneel and beg for mercy. But we may also question whether it is merciful to return to Shylock half of his goods, only to take away his religion and his profession.

Mercy, as delivered in The Merchant of Venice, never manages to be as sweet, selfless, or full of grace as Portia presents it.

Hatred as a Cyclical Phenomenon Throughout the play, Shylock claims that he is simply applying the lessons taught to him by his Christian neighbors; this claim becomes an integral part of both his character and his argument in court.

As the play continues, and Shylock unveils more of his reasoning, the same idea rears its head over and over—he is simply applying what years of abuse have taught him.

Antonio does not, as he has in the past, kick or spit on Shylock.Download-Theses Mercredi 10 juin Love and Hate. There are various types of love explored in the play. From which characters do we learn about the different sorts of love?

Love and Hate in . Salome Jens Salome Jens has appeared in lead roles on Broadway in Far Country, Night Life, The Disenchanted, Patriot For Me, A Lie of the Mind.

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One of the most famous and misunderstood lines in the Shakespeare canon is this one from Henry VI. The first thing we do, lets kill all the lawyers. Just about everyone I know assumes that this famous line, spoken by Dick the Butcher (one of Shakespeare more simplistic and unmemorable villains), is an expression of Shakespeare’s personal disdain for lawyers.

Mercy, as delivered in The Merchant of Venice, never manages to be as sweet, selfless, or full of grace as Portia presents it. Hatred as a Cyclical Phenomenon Throughout the play, Shylock claims that he is simply applying the lessons taught to him by his Christian neighbors; this claim becomes an integral part of both his character and his.

William Shakespeare (–) was a poet, playwright, and actor who is widely regarded as one of the most influential writers in the history of the English leslutinsduphoenix.com referred to as the Bard of Avon, Shakespeare's vast body of work includes comedic, tragic, .

Shakespeare's Character of Shylock in 'The Merchant of Venice' - Assignment Example